July 23, 2018
July 23, 2018

A concussion is a brain injury that cannot be seen on routine x-rays, CT scans, or MRIs. It affects the way a person may think and remember things, and can cause a variety of symptoms.  Because a concussion is not a visible injury, extra care is required.  A suspected concussion must be treated as an actual concussion until professional medical attention is sought.  To help you know how to respond, follow Parachute Canada’s Concussion Guidelines for Trainers and Coaches below.

  • The athlete should stop playing the sport right away.
  • They should not be left alone and should be seen by a doctor as soon as possible that day.
  • If an athlete is knocked out, call an ambulance to take them to a hospital immediately. Do not move the athlete or remove athletic equipment like a helmet as there may also be a cervical spine injury; wait for paramedics to arrive.
  • An athlete with a concussion should not go back to play that day, even if they say they are feeling better. Problems caused by a head injury can get worse later that day or night.
  • They should not return to sports until he/she has been seen by a doctor

If a suspected concussion has been identified, then the injured person or his/her parents/guardians must provide his/her coach and the OLLB Safety Officer with the following documents before being allowed to return to play (whether practices or games):

No Concussion:

A completed OLLB Concussion Return-to-Play Certification Form signed by a medical professional and parent/guardian indicating that no concussion was suffered.

***OR***

Concussion:

A completed OLLB Concussion Return-to-Play Certification Form signed by a medical professional and parent/guardian indicating the injured person has completed a supervised return to play program and is cleared to return to play